MRCP gateway for mobile devices

Abstract

A system and method for securely bridging mobile-originated Media Resource Control Protocol (MRCP) transactions with at least one Media Resource Server. A mobile device initiates TCP/IP requests to a MRCP Gateway Server over at least one of the wireless and mobile broadband capabilities of the mobile device. The MRCP Gateway Server includes TCP/IP-based ingress, and the MRCP Gateway Server is arranged in front of the at least one Media Resource Server. The Media Resource Server supports MRCP communication. A secure channel may be established between the mobile device and MRCP Gateway Server, and the mobile device may pass authorization credentials, media resource requirements, and additional user-defined data to the MRCP Gateway Server over the secure channel.

Claims

What is claimed is: 1. A method for securely bridging a mobile-originated Media Resource Control Protocol (MRCP) transaction with at least one Media Resource Server utilizing at least one of wireless and mobile broadband capabilities of a mobile device, the method comprising: transmitting Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) requests from the mobile device via at least one of wireless and mobile broadband capabilities of the mobile device to a MRCP Gateway Server having TCP/IP-based ingress, wherein the MRCP Gateway Server is communicatively coupled to the at least one Media Resource Server, and wherein the at least one Media Resource Server supports MRCP communication; establishing a secure channel to host the MRCP communication between the mobile device and the MRCP Gateway Server; transmitting authorization credentials and media resource requirements from the mobile device over the secure channel to the MRCP gateway to allow the MRCP Gateway Server to authenticate the mobile device; receiving an authentication confirmation including a port on the MRCP Gateway Server to be used for subsequent packet transfers, and wherein a placeholder port number is utilized to indicate that RTP traffic will be multiplexed over the secure channel; authorizing access to at least one advanced MRCP speech processing feature provided by a voice application server via a call data manager operating on the mobile device; processing a majority of a call flow via a voice browser operating on the mobile device for a call session between the mobile device and the voice application server to provide an IVR application on the mobile device; and transmitting packet data from the mobile device to the port on the MRCP Gateway Server responsive to receiving the authentication confirmation, and wherein the packet data comprises Real-Time Protocol (RTP) traffic which is transmitted from the mobile device as User Datagram Protocol (UDP) packets to the port on the MRCP Gateway Server. 2. The method as claimed in claim 1 , further comprising establishing the secure channel using one of Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) and Transport Layer Security (TLS) security protocols between the mobile device and the MRCP Gateway Server. 3. The method as claimed in claim 1 , further comprising verifying the authorization credentials, asserting that an appropriate media resource is available, and replying with an OK response signaling the mobile device to continue with the MRCP transaction. 4. The method as claimed in claim 1 , further comprising replying with a failure code and initiating shutdown of the secure channel, upon at least one of unsuccessful verification of the authorization credentials and unavailability of a required media resource. 5. The method as claimed in claim 2 , further comprising sending Real-Time Protocol (RTP) traffic from the MRCP Gateway Server as User Datagram Protocol (UDP) packets to a port of the mobile device. 6. The method as claimed in claim 2 , further comprising shutting down the secure channel at the end of the MRCP transaction. 7. A system for securely bridging a mobile-originated Media Resource Control Protocol (MRCP) transaction with at least one Media Resource Server, the system comprising: a MRCP Gateway Server having Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)-based ingress and communicatively coupled to the at least one Media Resource Server, wherein the at least one Media Resource Server supports MRCP communication; and a mobile device operable to transmit TCP/IP requests from the mobile device via at least one of wireless and mobile broadband capabilities to the MRCP Gateway Server, wherein responsive to the transmitted TCP/IP requests, establishing a secure channel to host the MRCP communication between the mobile device and the MRCP Gateway Server, and wherein the mobile device is configured to transmit authorization credentials and media resource requirements from the mobile device over the secure channel to the MRCP gateway to allow the MRCP Gateway Server to authenticate the mobile device; receive an authentication confirmation including a port on the MRCP Gateway Server to be used for subsequent packet transfers, and wherein a placeholder port number is utilized to indicate that RTP traffic will be multiplexed over the secure channel; and authorize access to at least one advanced MRCP speech processing feature provided by a voice application server via a call data manager operating on the mobile device; process a majority of a call flow via a voice browser operating on the mobile device for a call session between the mobile device and the voice application server to provide an IVR application on the mobile device; transmit packet data from the mobile device to the port on the MRCP Gateway Server responsive to receiving the authentication confirmation, and wherein the packet data comprises Real-Time Protocol (RTP) traffic which is transmitted from the mobile device as User Datagram Protocol (UDP) packets to the port on the MRCP Gateway Server. 8. The system as claimed in claim 7 , further comprising a secure channel between the mobile device and the MRCP Gateway Server, using one of SSL and TSL security protocols. 9. The system as claimed in claim 7 , wherein the MRCP Gateway Server is operable to verify the authorization credentials, to assert availability of an appropriate media resource, and to reply to the mobile device with an OK response signaling the mobile device to continue with the MRCP transaction. 10. The system as claimed in claim 7 , wherein the MRCP Gateway Server is operable to respond to the mobile device with a failure code and to initiate shutdown of the secure channel, if the MRCP Gateway Server is unsuccessful in at least one of verifying the authorization credentials and determining availability of a required media resource. 11. The system as claimed in claim 7 , wherein the MRCP Gateway Server is operable to establish and maintain sessions with MRCP media resources for the TCP/IP requests initiated by the mobile device. 12. The system as claimed in claim 7 , wherein the MRCP Gateway Server is operable to support multiple redundant MRCP media resources via a built-in load-balancing functionality. 13. The system as claimed in claim 7 , wherein at least one of the mobile device and the MRCP Gateway Server is operable to initiate shutdown of a connection between the mobile device and the MRCP Gateway Server so as to end a MRCP Gateway Server session. 14. A non-transitory computer-readable storage medium comprising instructions that when executed cause a processor to perform securely bridging mobile device-originated Media Resource Control Protocol (MRCP) transactions with at least one Media Resource Server, the instructions causing the processor to perform: transmitting Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) requests from the mobile device via least one of wireless and mobile broadband capabilities of the mobile device to a MRCP Gateway Server, wherein the MRCP Gateway Server includes TCP/IP-based ingress, wherein the MRCP Gateway Server is communicatively coupled to the at least one Media Resource Server, and wherein the at least one Media Resource Server supports MRCP communication; establishing a secure channel to host the MRCP communication between the mobile device and the MRCP Gateway Server; transmitting authorization credentials and media resource requirements from the mobile device over the secure channel to the MRCP gateway to allow the MRCP Gateway Server to authenticate the mobile device; receiving an authentication confirmation including a port on the MRCP Gateway Server to be used for subsequent packet transfers, and wherein a placeholder port number is utilized to indicate that RTP traffic will be multiplexed over the secure channel; authorizing access to at least one advanced MRCP speech processing feature provided by a voice application server via a call data manager operating on the mobile device; processing a majority of a call flow via a voice browser operating on the mobile device for a call session between the mobile device and the voice application server to provide an IVR application on the mobile device; and transmitting packet data from the mobile device to the port on the MRCP Gateway Server responsive to receiving the authentication confirmation, and wherein the packet data comprises Real-Time Protocol (RTP) traffic which is transmitted from the mobile device as User Datagram Protocol (UDP) packets to the port on the MRCP Gateway Server.
BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION The present invention relates a Media Resource Control Protocol (MRCP) gateway for mobile devices. More particularly, the present invention relates to a system and method for securely bridging mobile-originated MRCP transactions with at least one Media Resource Server utilizing at least one of the wireless and mobile broadband capabilities of the mobile device. In telephony, Interactive Voice Response (IVR) is a technology that allows a computer to detect voice and touch tones in a telephone call. Many companies employ systems based on IVR technology to process and route telephone calls originating from their respective customers. Examples include telephone banking, televoting, and credit card transactions. IVR systems are typically used to service high call volumes, reduce cost and improve the customer experience. If a customer dials a telephone number that is answered by an IVR system, the system executes an application that responds to the customer/caller with pre-recorded or dynamically generated audio files. These audio files explain the options available to the caller and direct the caller on how to proceed. The caller selects an option by using spoken words or Dual-Tone Multi-Frequency (DMTF) tones, e.g., telephone keypad touch tones. Modern IVR applications are structured similar to World Wide Web pages, using languages such as VoiceXML. Other languages may include, for example, SALT or T-XML. Since many companies do not have their own IVR platforms, they typically turn to outsourcing companies or vendors to either host their VoiceXML application or manage the application as a whole. An example of such a hosted environment is shown in FIG. 1 . The hosted environment shown in FIG. 1 may include end user devices, such as a mobile device 105 or a land-line phone 110 ; hosted vendor systems 115 ; and client systems 120 . The mobile device 105 , such as a cellular phone, PDA, or iPhone, and/or the land-line phone 110 may communicate with the hosted vendor systems 115 via a telephony interface 125 . The telephony interface 125 , in turn, interacts with a VoiceXML browser 130 , a MRCP TTS Server 135 , and a MRCP Speech Recognition Server 140 , all of which are part of the hosted vendor systems 115 . The VoiceXML browser 130 may be an extension of a web browser that presents an interactive voice user interface to the user and that operates on pages that specify voice dialogs. These pages may be written in VoiceXML language, which is the W3C's standard voice dialog markup language, but other proprietary voice dialog languages may be used. The VoiceXML browser 130 may present information aurally, using pre-recorded audio file playback or using Text-To-Speech (US) software to render textual information as audio. Further, the VoiceXML browser 130 may obtain information from the end user of the mobile device 105 and/or the land-line phone 110 by speech recognition and keypad entry, e.g., DTMF detection. The VoiceXML browser 130 interacts with the MRCP TTS Server 135 and the MRCP Speech Recognition Server 140 . MRCP stands for Media Resource Control Protocol, which is a communication protocol that allows speech servers to provide various speech services, such as speech recognition, speech synthesis, and TTS to its clients. The MRCP TTS Server 135 provides TTS services to its clients, and the MRCP Speech Recognition Server 140 provides speech recognition services to its clients. Computer Telephone Integration (CTI) data are sent from the hosted vendor systems 115 to a CTI Management Server 145 . CTI is a technology that allows interactions on a telephone and a computer to be integrated or coordinated. As contact channels have expanded from voice to email, web, and fax, CTI has expanded to include the integration of all customer contact channels (voice, email, web, fax, etc.) with computer systems. Common functions that may be implemented using CTI are, for example, call routing, call information display with or without using calling line data, phone control (answer, hang up, hold, conference, etc.), automatic dialing and computer-controlled dialing, etc. Furthermore, application requests are sent from the VoiceXML Browser 130 to a VoiceXML Application Server 150 , and the requested VoiceXML application is delivered from the VoiceXML Application Server 150 to the VoiceXML Server 130 . The CTI Management Server 145 and the VoiceXML Application Server 150 are both part of the client systems 120 . More and more people use intelligent mobile devices, such as cellular phones, PDAs, or iPhones, as a means of communication. These intelligent mobile devices become more and more sophisticated due to, for example, increased computing power or memory capacity, and due to, for example, the availability of mobile Software Development Kits (SDKs), such as Java Platform, Micro Edition (Java ME) or Apple's iPhone SDK. This may lead to decreased reliance on teleservices companies that are built on standard telephony technology. More particularly, this may lead to decreased reliance on hosted environments for IVR applications, for example. BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION The present invention, in exemplary embodiments, overcomes the above disadvantages and other disadvantages not described above. Also, the present invention is not required to overcome the disadvantages described above, and an exemplary embodiment of the present invention may not overcome any of the problems described above. Thus, in one aspect, the present invention is directed to a method for securely bridging mobile-originated Media Resource Control Protocol (MRCP) transactions with at least one Media Resource Server, wherein at least one of the wireless and mobile broadband capabilities of a mobile device is utilized. Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP) requests are initiated from the mobile device over the at least one of the wireless and mobile broadband capabilities to a MRCP Gateway Server. The MRCP Gateway Server has TCP/IP-based ingress and is arranged in front of the at least one Media Resource Server. The at least one Media Resource Server supports MRCP communication. In another aspect, the present invention is directed to a system for securely bridging mobile-originated Media Resource Control Protocol (MRCP) transactions with at least on Media Resource Server, wherein the system comprises a MRCP Gateway Server and a mobile device. The MRCP Gateway Server has TCP/IP-based ingress and is arranged in front of the at least one Media Resource Server, wherein the at least one Media Resource Server supports MRCP communication. The mobile device is operable to initiate TCP/IP requests over the mobile device's at least one of wireless and mobile broadband capabilities to the MRCP Gateway Server. In yet another aspect, the present invention is directed to a computer-readable medium comprising instructions for securely bridging mobile device-originated Media Resource Control Protocol (MRCP) transactions with at least one Media Resource Server. The instructions are for initiating TCP/IP requests from the mobile device over at least one of wireless and mobile broadband capabilities of the mobile device to a MRCP Gateway Server. The MRCP Gateway Server includes TCP/P-based ingress and is arranged in front of at least one Media Resource Server. The Media Resource Server supports MRCP communication. The present invention may allow companies requiring only a basic, DTMF-only IVR application to host their VoiceXML application on their existing web infrastructure and provide users of mobile devices access to the same IVR functionality that would normally need to be provided by an outsourced vendor. Companies requiring more advanced features as part of their IVR application may still benefit from the present invention by moving the call handling and VoiceXML processing off of a hosted platform and only using an outsourced vendor to perform advanced features such as speech recognition, natural language, or text-to-speech. Alternatively, the present invention may allow companies to move both basic, DTMF-only IVR applications and IVR applications with advanced features off of the hosted platform to their existing web infrastructure. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING In the following section, the invention will be described with reference to exemplary embodiments illustrated in the attached Figures, in which: FIG. 1 illustrates a hosted environment for IVR applications as it may be known in the related art; FIG. 2 illustrates a Mobile Voice Self Service (MVSS) system in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention; FIG. 3 illustrates an MVSS VoiceXML Navigation situation in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention; FIG. 4 illustrates incorporation of multimedia data into MVSS in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention; FIG. 5 illustrates a method in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention; and FIG. 6 illustrates a method in accordance with another exemplary embodiment of the present invention. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION Reference will now be made in detail to exemplary embodiments of the present invention, examples of which are illustrated in the accompanying drawings. Given the rapidly increasing processing power of mobile devices and the availability of mobile SDKs, a hosted application browser of the related art, such as a hosted VoiceXML browser, may be moved directly to an end user's mobile device. In other words, an application browser, such as a VoiceXML browser, and other, associated components may be deployed as a mobile application and implemented on the mobile device to allow a VoiceXML application to be processed directly on the mobile device. This concept may also be known as Mobile Voice Self Service (MVSS). MVSS may provide the benefit of reduced cost or, in the case of simple applications, no hosting cost to companies, for example. In addition, the end-user features that MVSS provides may allow applications to become more user-friendly. FIG. 2 illustrates an MVSS system in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention. As shown in FIG. 2 , a mobile device 205 communicates with client systems 210 and media resource systems 215 of a vendor. The mobile device 205 may include an Application Browser 220 that interacts with a Call Data Manager 225 and a Media Resource Gateway 230 . The Call Data Manager 225 and the Media Resource Gateway 230 may also be included in the mobile device 205 . These components may utilize the mobile device's 205 mobile broadband or wireless connection to communicate with the client systems 210 or the service vendor's media resource systems 215 . The mobile device 205 may be, for example, a cellular phone, a PDA, or an iPhone, and may operate, for example, in a CDMA or GSM network. The mobile device 205 may also include a GPS component 235 to provide, for example, location-based services to the user of the mobile device 205 . As is the case in the related art, the client systems 210 may include a VoiceXML Application Server 240 and a CTI Management Server 245 . The vendor's media resources systems 215 may include an MRCP Speech Recognition Server 250 , a Media Resource Gateway 255 , and a MRCP TTS Server 260 . The Application Browser 220 of the mobile device 205 may be a VoiceXML 2.1 compliant browser with a minimal memory footprint and minimal processing overhead. Unlike the VoiceXML browsers used in a hosted environment in the related art, the Application Browser or VoiceXML browser 220 may only need to be able to handle one call. Therefore, the required processing power is significantly reduced. In addition, the VoiceXML browser 220 may be able to handle a majority of the call flow required to provide an IVR application to the user of the mobile device 205 . The VoiceXML browser 220 may send application requests to the VoiceXML Application Server 240 , and the requested VoiceXML application may be delivered from the VoiceXML Application Server 240 to the VoiceXML browser 220 . The Call Data Manager 225 may communicate important telephony events to the client systems 210 , in particular to the CTI Management Server 245 . Such telephony events may include, for example, set up, deliver (ringing), establish (answer), clear (hang up), end, hold, retrieve from hold, conference, transfer, forward, etc. When a legitimate call is being processed on the mobile device 205 , the call data provided by the Call Data Manager 225 may be used, in conjunction with data of the VoiceXML Application Server 240 , to authorize access to advanced MRCP features. The advanced MRCP features may include automatic speech recognition (ASR) that may be provided by the MRCP Speech Recognition Server 250 or Text-To-Speech (TTS) that may be provided by the MRCP TTS Server 260 , for example. Proper authentication may be important because MRCP features may be charged per transaction by the vendor. Also, the Call Data Manager 225 may be important with respect to transfers. Transfers that usually depend on a carrier's advanced features may need to be implemented by other means, so it may be necessary for User-to-User Information (UUI) and other call data to be transferred out-of-band. The Media Resource Gateway 255 may provide advanced services, such as ASR or TTS to the application, by bridging communication between the VoiceXML browser 220 and the MRCP services. As part of authorizing communication to media resources, MRCP requests from the VoiceXML browser 220 may be directed through the Media Resource Gateway 255 . The gateway layer may handle authentication and then host the MRCP communication through the established channel. If the mobile device 205 is capable of processing speech or generating TTS on its own, resources not requiring vendor-specific handling may be passed off to the mobile device 205 by the Media Resource Gateway 230 , thereby saving the application provider additional advanced service fees. To facilitate the configuration of MVSS components prior to running a VoiceXML document, a Mobile Voice Self Service configuration file may be used. This file may be an xml-based configuration file that contains the configuration settings of the Media Resource Gateway 230 and the Call Data Manager 225 as well as the URL of the intended VoiceXML target. Having a unique file type for voice applications targeted to mobile devices may also be useful in allowing seamless integration of MVSS into a web environment. A mobile device may automatically launch the MVSS application when the user follows a link that provides MVSS content. The format of such a file may be defined, published and validated via standard xml validation methods. Simple blind transfers may be accomplished by allowing the MVSS application to access the phone's system APIs (Application Programming Interfaces) to simply dial the transfer number. More complicated transfers may require functions that may be unavailable within the realm of the mobile device's capabilities on the mobile carrier's network. To implement these transfers may require dialing a toll-free number that has carrier-advanced features and then utilizing CTI data to execute the transfer. The following may be exemplary applications of MVSS that may be advantageous to, for example, the end users, vendors, service providers, companies and clients involved. With respect to access to IVR applications, in the case of MVSS, the user may be allowed to access applications via web URLs rather than phone numbers. A client's site may list individual URLs for each subsection of their application, giving the user direct access to billing or technical support features, without the need for the client to have individual phone numbers for each service. Having direct access to the VoiceXML interpretation allows the user to easily “pause” the IVR, and it may be relatively simple to provide a complete range of controls a user would normally be accustomed to with other media, such as fast forward, rewind, etc. Instead of having to rely on the application's menu repeat options, the user may interact with the browser instructing it to scan through a prompt in reverse, go back to the beginning of the current prompt or menu, or even go to a previous menu and either accept the user's original response again or provide new input. To support such features, when it comes to application reporting, it may be beneficial to create new VoiceXML events that the browser can handle, so reporting can accurately reflect the user's navigation. FIG. 3 shows an exemplary illustration of MVSS VoiceXML Navigation. Having direct access to the call flow data may allow implementing user-defined hotkeys or “bookmarks” in a VoiceXML application. If the user would like to return to a portion of an application at a later time, he or she may press a hotkey capture button, which may then suspend the running VoiceXML application. The MVSS browser may store the current state and the input required to reach that state. After speaking or entering a bookmark identifier, the application may resume normally. At a later time, the user may request access to the bookmark, and this may instruct MVSS to load the application and automatically proceed to the bookmarked state if modifications to the applications do not prevent it. In the case where the application has been modified, MVSS may provide a message to the user indicating the bookmark needs to be updated; present the user with the prompt where the application changed; and wait for the user to indicate that he or she has once again reached the point in the application the user wishes to bookmark. Location-based services is another area in which having the MVSS browser running directly on the mobile device may be of advantage. Providing location-based information to customers may mean to add more value in the mobile realm. Rather than relying on complicated data exchanges to determine the location of the caller, the browser may directly access the device's GPS or tower based coordinates and pass them on to the application server. This may all be done as part of the initial request to the application server. Self-service applications may then be catered for the caller's current location prior to even the first prompt. Multimedia resources, as illustrated, for example, in FIG. 4 , may be referenced within the VoiceXML application, allowing the mobile device to display supplemental data during the progress of the call. This may be utilized by providing an image of the caller's current billing statement when the caller requests payment information; by providing a video clip of the steps required to reset a satellite receiver when the caller is requesting technical support; or even by launching a web page with a registration form when the caller wants to enroll in some special program. There may also be the branding aspect that may be important to many companies, so a company logo, customer notifications, or advertising may be displayed on the mobile device while working with their IVR. In the VoIP world, it may be common for a conference call to be presented along with video conferencing or a shared desktop for a presentation. MVSS may add functionality in the voice self-service world because the multimedia may also interact back with the IVR. For example, if the caller has a question about their bill, MVSS may display the caller's recent billing statement on the screen and allow the user to select the billing line-item the caller has a question about and say “What is this charge”? Again, due to the fact that the VoiceXML interpretation is happening locally on the caller's phone, the act of selecting an item on the screen may be passed to the browser as input without complex data exchanges. This sort of interaction may be simplified because MVSS is just a single system that accepts multiple forms of input. MVSS technology may be an industry standard that may be implemented by mobile device builders as part of their devices' core features. There may be several versions of MVSS to support various mobile device architectures. Open development environments like Java ME may aid in that sort of development, but each device may require its own special development for its unique features or hardware. FIG. 5 illustrates a method in accordance with an exemplary embodiment of the present invention. In step 510 , an application browser that is implemented on an MVSS mobile device may request an application from an application server. The application browser may be a VoiceXML browser; the application may be a VoiceXML application; and the application server may be a VoiceXML application server. In step 520 , a call data manager may provide call data. The call data manager may also be implemented on the MVSS mobile device. The call data, in conjunction with data from the application server, may authorize access to advanced MRCP services such as ASR or TTS. In step 530 , the advanced MRCP services may be provided to the application that was requested by the application browser. The advanced MRCP services may be provided by a media resource gateway. In another exemplary embodiment of the present invention, a system and method are provided for securely bridging mobile-originated MRCP transactions with a media resource server utilizing the wireless or mobile broadband capabilities of the mobile device. Therein, a MRCP Gateway Server, with Transmission Control Protocol/Internet Protocol (TCP/IP)-based ingress, may front one or more media resource servers which support MRCP communication. As shown in FIG. 6 , TCP/IP requests may be initiated 610 from a mobile device over the device's wireless or mobile broadband connectivity to the MRCP Gateway Server. A secure channel may be established 620 using Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), Transport Layer Security (TLS), or some other security protocol. The mobile device may pass 630 authorization credentials, media resource requirements, and additional user-defined data over the secure channel. The MRCP Gateway Server may verify 640 the credentials, may assert that the appropriate media resource is available, and may reply to the mobile device with an “OK” response to signal the mobile device to continue with the transaction. Upon authorization or resource failure, the MRCP Gateway Server may respond 650 to the mobile device with a failure code and may initiate the shutdown of the secure channel. Where the mobile device and MRCP Gateway have the ability, the Real-Time Protocol (RTP) traffic may be sent from the mobile device as User Datagram Protocol (UDP) packets to a port on the MRCP Gateway. Likewise, the MRCP Gateway may send RTP data as UDP messages directly to a port on the mobile device. The initial credential exchange and MRCP setup may determine the capabilities of the devices and may establish these port numbers. A placeholder port number (port:0) may be used to indicate RTP traffic should be multiplexed over the secure channel. The MRCP Gateway may be responsible for establishing and maintaining sessions with the MRCP media resources for the incoming mobile requests. It may also have built-in load balancing functionality for supporting multiple redundant media resources. The default behavior of this system may be that the secure channel and TCP/IP connection are torn down at the end of a single transaction. Provisions may be made via additional user-defined data to retain the bridge connection for subsequent transactions. Either the mobile device or the gateway server may initiate a shutdown of the connection to end the MRCP gateway session. As will be recognized by those skilled in the art, the innovative concepts described in the present application can be modified and varied over a wide range of applications. Accordingly, the scope of patented subject matter should not be limited to any of the specific exemplary teachings discussed above, but is instead defined by the following claims.

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